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Lo Que Importa | Are Hispanics Republican by Nature?

¿Los hispanos son por naturaleza republicanos? | Lo Que Importa

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Just a couple of months away from a midterm election that could change the American political landscape, an increasingly involved Hispanic community is drawing the attention of the major parties, especially as Latinos flock to the Republican Party. In this installment of Lo Que Importa, our co-editor-in-chief, Vanessa Vallejo, talks with Astrid Hajjar, a Venezuelan lawyer, and political strategist.

After years of neglect by the GOP, today its leaders strive to capture the discontent of Latinos with Democratic policies, and appeal to the conservative values that identify the community.

For Hajjar, there is no doubt that this is a historic moment, and the relevance of Hispanic voters is, in his words, extraordinary. “The biggest story in politics is the Hispanic community’s rejection of progressive policies,” said the strategist. “The rightward shift of Latinos in the United States is going to realign American politics.”

Hispanics will define policy

Hajjar believes that the Hispanic community, which today numbers more than 60 million citizens, will determine the future of the country from the Republican Party, especially in the face of a Democratic Party that sees them as a homogeneous collective.

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“Latinos are not monolithic. That is why the Republican Party and the conservative movement are attracting more Latinos: because they see them as individuals,” said the lawyer, and pointed out that the Democrats’ blunders, such as the lack of respect for the first lady, Jill Biden, reinforce the discontent in the community.

Hajjar further states that the immigration crisis at the southern border is “a violation of human rights that hasn’t been seen in generations,” and it affects the Hispanic community to a greater extent. She pointed to the Secretary of Homeland Security, Alejandro Mayorkas, “the most powerful Hispanic” in the country, as the main responsible party.

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Vanessa Vallejo. Co-editor-in-chief of El American. Economist. Podcaster. Political and economic analysis of America. Colombian exile in the United States // Vanessa Vallejo. Co-editora en jefe de El American. Economista. Podcaster. Análisis político y económico de América. Colombiana exiliada en EE. UU.

Tomás Lugo, journalist and writer. Born in Venezuela and graduated in Social Communication. Has written for international media outlets. Currently living in Colombia // Tomás Lugo, periodista y articulista. Nacido en Venezuela y graduado en Comunicación Social. Ha escrito para medios internacionales. Actualmente reside en Colombia.

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