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To Mexico’s Cowardly PAN Members, With Love

Los panistas cobardes huyen ante Abascal. Imagen: Unsplash

Esta entrada también está disponible en: Español

[Leer en español]

Dear cowardly PAN members, my friends. You know that I appreciate you and that I like you. You know that you are good beasts, although sometimes it would be nice if you were a little less beastly.

I also know that they don’t like being cowards, but are afraid to stop being so. I also understand that the visit of Santiago Abascal (president of Vox) to the Mexican Senate, invited by the PAN senator Julen Rementería, has awakened your most acute fears.

However, Abascal is already back in Spain, so you can breathe and come out of hiding. Let’s talk, with all charity.

I start: I understand you, I really do.

You saw Santiago Abascal, Eduardo Verástegui, Agustín Laje and a good part of the brave right wing making presence in a political space that until now had belonged almost entirely to you, and you were afraid.

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They realized that Abascal has in just one of his speeches more personality, credibility and strength than the last 10 PAN leaders have shown in their entire political career, and you panicked.

That is why, prey to cowardice, you launched yourselves against your fellow PAN members and against Vox, through messages clumsily posted on social networks, where you accused Santiago Abascal and his party of being “totalitarian,” “extremists,” “violent” and “fascists,” repeating like parrots a discourse that you did not even understand, against a party that you do not really know.

That explains why, when the right wing itself replied and we demanded that you explain the arguments on which you based your accusations against Vox, you either deleted your tweet or hid your cell phones.

That afternoon on Thursday, September 2, I asked you on Twitter if you are really happy carrying the socialist logos of the PRI and the PRD, but you are so burned by the fact that Santiago Abascal is coming. Well, now that the mood has calmed down, I repeat the question:

Do you really feel so happy and content to share logos with the PRI and the PRD, 2 parties of the Socialist International and historically opposed to the PAN, but you are hurt to the point of public condemnation by the mere visit of the leader of Vox, who (you know it and I know it too) is much closer to Acción Nacional?

And yes, I know what they will answer: “It is that the alliance with the PRI and the PRD is necessary to defeat López Obrador.” I may not like many things about Va por México and I could question (as I have done and will continue to do) its campaign communication strategies, but in the current circumstances the need for such alliance is evident, as we discussed in the interview that Gustavo de Hoyos, leader of Sí por México, granted us exclusively for El American.

 La visita de Vox a México puso en pánico a los panistas cobardes. Imagen: EFE/Kiko Huesca
Vox’s visit to Mexico put cowardly PAN members in a panic. (EFE)

Well, it should be equally respectable for you, my dear cowardly PAN members, that the national leader of a legal and democratic party, which participates in the electoral struggle with full respect for Spanish laws and the principles of liberal democracy, visits Mexico.

Yes, I also understand that you were afraid of the negative reaction of the left to the visit of Santiago Abascal, but by running like frightened chicks to disassociate yourselves from Voxs without a moderately solid argument, you have sent a deep message of weakness.

You looked like your leftist pets. Each one of your tweets condemning the meeting with Abascal and defaming Vox was the Pavlovian reflex of a cowardly right wing, which is so used to asking for mercy from the left that it already does it automatically, as a reflex. Without thinking.

It is basically the same thing I had explained some months ago. When the left accuses you of being backward or fascist, you put your head down, hoping that they won’t criticize you too much, and if you speak up it is to claim that you are cool and modern, but nothing more a little bit less than the progressives. You basically ask the left to give you permission to be a little conservative and then bend over when the progressives deny you that permission and humiliate you once again.

They applied it to you again. You wanted to position yourselves as moderate and modern, but you ended up as cowards and chaotic, running from one side to the other in an attempt to show progressives that you are not dangerous, that you are small and obedient.

I find it very curious how you used against Vox the same lies that the left uses daily to defame you. You know, the story that they are “fascists and ultra-right wingers.” In doing so, you fulfilled the stereotype of the nerd who lashes out at the rest of the math club, accusing them of being nerds, in the hopes that the popular girls in high school will let him sit at the table with them. And we know they will never get it together.

No way, my dear cowardly PAN members. This week you not only showed your copper, you melted it down to forge your chains as slaves of progressivism, but you can still change.

I understand that Santiago Abascal scared you and that you are jealous of him. I also understand that he is not perfect and that Vox is not heaven on earth, they are politicians; but much braver and more charismatic than you. Of course, the example of Vox is being sown in Mexico so, either you learn and become a little less fearful, or you will remain cowards…and making fools of yourselves.

Gerardo Garibay Camarena, is a doctor of law, writer and political analyst with experience in the public and private sectors. His new book is "How to Play Chess Without Craps: A Guide to Reading Politics and Understanding Politicians" // Gerardo Garibay Camarena es doctor en derecho, escritor y analista político con experiencia en el sector público y privado. Su nuevo libro es “Cómo jugar al ajedrez Sin dados: Una guía para leer la política y entender a los políticos”

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